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The U.S. Supreme Court indicated it had no interest in intervening in any election result challenge by President Donald Trump’s campaign before the constitutionally mandated swearing-in date, giving Pennsylvania officials until two days after Joe Biden’s scheduled inauguration to respond to the latest lawsuit.

The court has turned away other challenges – such as one out of Texas and joined by 17 other states – on procedural grounds such as “standing,” or the claim of harm. The most recent case out of Pennsylvania disputed Pennsylvania’s Secretary of State’s Kathy Boockvar’s decisions – upheld by the state Supreme Court – that loosened state law with regards to signature verification, canvassing observations and voter requirements on ballots.

“As described above, non-legislative officials, oftentimes at the instigation of partisan third parties, ignored or significantly altered and thereby violated state election law, including, most tremblingly, laws enacted to minimize the risk of fraud in mail voting and thereby protect the integrity of the election process,” the Trump campaign lawsuit reads.

“The decisions of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, an elected body, also raised serious concerns whether these were partisan attempts to assist the Democratic candidate whose campaign strategy of utilizing mail ballots was well publicized, in comparison to President’s Trump’s well-known strategy to encourage in-person voting.”

The U.S. Supreme Court split 4-4 in October on whether to block another ruling by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court regarding late mail-in ballots, allowing for the Pennsylvania court’s ruling to stand.

The Trump campaign had asked the U.S. Supreme Court to make Boockvar and others named in the latest suit respond by Wednesday and issue a ruling by Jan. 6, the date Congress is set to vote on whether to certify the Electoral College results.
(Newsmax)
https://twitter.com/SidneyPowell1/status/1342667417747599360?s=19

Sidney Powell Blasts GOP For Not Backing Donald Trump’s Election Challenges: ‘The Republican Party Is History’

Trump-supporting lawyer Sidney Powell is going after the Republican Party for failing to back the president’s attempts to challenge the election results.

Powell, who has led a number of cases challenging results in several states and raising accusations of fraud, took to Twitter to quote a story about the Republican Party opposing incoming Alabama Senator Tommy Tuberville from joining an attempt to suspend the tally of the Electoral College vote next month.

“WOW. The #Republican party is history,” Powell tweeted. “It committed suicide So out of touch-they don’t get #TrumpWon. Not #GOP Patriots will create a new one soon or take it over. The @RNC is part of problem—the uni-party. #WeThePeople are reclaiming our country.”

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As The Hill reported, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was planning to reach out to Tuberville in an attempt to dissuade him from joining the effort to challenge the Electoral College tally, which was seen as a futile and pointless effort. The report added that Senate GOP Whip John Thune was going to speak to Tuberville as well, trying to convince him that the challenge could end up being damaging to Republicans.

“Ultimately every senator will have to make their own decision about that but I think there will be people, yeah, reaching out him just to kind of find out” his plans for the vote, Thune said.

“I’m hoping in the end that all senators will conclude that this election needs to be over with and it’s time to move on,” he added.

McConnell had already broken from Trump in congratulating Biden and acknowledging him as the winner. But Trump and allies have vowed to continue fighting, moving forward with a series of court cases seeking to overturn the voting outcome in a number of states. Nearly all of the cases have lost, with judges saying there is no evidence to back the claims of widespread fraud and often ruling that they do not have standing to challenge the outcome.

As The Inquisitr reported, some close to Trump say he has raised the idea of Vice President Mike Pence challenging the Electoral College next month. Pence is set to oversee the formal tallying process in his role as president of the U.S. Senate, though Trump had reportedly pressed for him to refuse to certify the process, not understanding that he did not have the power to change the outcome.

“Sources say Trump in recent days has brought the matter up to the vice president and has been ‘confused’ as to why Pence can’t overturn the results of the election on January 6,” CNN reported.

(Inquisitr)

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Donald Trump

Trump unleashes scathing statement blasting Sen. Mitch McConnell

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Former President Donald Trump issued a scathing statement on Tuesday in which he excoriated Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

“Mitch is a dour, sullen, and unsmiling political hack, and if Republican Senators are going to stay with him, they will not win again,” Trump said in the statement.

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Trump acquitted in impeachment trial; 7 GOP Senators vote with Democrats to convict

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The Senate on Saturday voted to acquit former President Donald Trump on a charge of incitement of insurrection largely along party lines, bringing an end to the fourth impeachment trial in U.S. history and the second for Trump.

Only seven Republicans voted to convict Trump for allegedly inciting the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol, when a mob of pro-Trump supporters tried to disrupt the electoral vote count formalizing Joe Biden’s election win before a joint session of Congress. The final vote was 57 to 43, far short of the 67 votes needed to secure a conviction.

Republican Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Susan Collins of Maine, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania all voted guilty.

The vote means the Senate cannot bar Trump from holding future federal offices.

Moments after the vote concluded, the former president issued a statement praising his legal team and thanking the senators and other members of Congress “who stood proudly for the Constitution we all revere and for the sacred legal principles at the heart of our country.”

With control of the Senate split 50-50, the House managers always had an uphill battle when it came to convincing enough Republicans to cross party lines and convict a former president who is still very popular with a large part of the GOP base.

In his closing argument, House manager Joe Neguse, D-Colo., argued, “The stakes could not be higher. Because the cold, hard truth is that what happened on January 6 can happen again. I fear, like many of you do, that the violence we saw on that terrible day may be just the beginning.”

Lead impeachment manager Jamie Raskin, D-Md., urged the senators to think of the future.

“Senators, this trial, in the final analysis, is not about Donald Trump. The country and the world know who Donald Trump is. This trial is about who we are, who we are,” Raskin said.

Trump lawyer Michael van der Veen, meanwhile, insisted his client did nothing wrong and maintained he was the victim of vengeful Democrats and a biased news media. He called the impeachment proceedings a “charade from beginning to end.”

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The managers’ task became more difficult Saturday when Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell announced in an email to his colleagues that he would vote to acquit since Trump was already out of office.

“While a close call, I am persuaded that impeachments are a tool primarily of removal and we therefore lack jurisdiction,” the influential Kentucky Republican wrote in the email, which was obtained by NBC News.

McConnell, who’d rebuffed Democratic efforts to start the trial while Trump was still in office, had condemned Trump’s conduct after the riot and said he’d keep an open mind about voting to convict — something he’d ruled out entirely during Trump’s first impeachment trial last year.

McConnell suggested in the email that Trump could still face other penalties.

“The Constitution makes perfectly clear that Presidential criminal misconduct while in office can be prosecuted after the President has left office, which in my view alleviates the otherwise troubling ‘January exception’ argument raised by the House,” he wrote.

Opening arguments began on Wednesday, with House managers blaming the riot on Trump’s months-long campaign to cast doubt on the 2020 election, and his repeated assertions that the only way he would lose was if the election was “stolen.” They focused on his fiery speech on the morning of the Jan. 6 riot, where he urged his supporters to “fight like hell” — and his refusal to take action after they did.

Trump declined a request from managers to testify at the trial, and refused to even submit a statement for it, facts Raskin urged senators to keep in mind on Saturday.

“I ask any of you, if you were charged with inciting violent insurrection against our country, and you’re falsely accused, would you come and testify? I know I would,” Raskin said.

The trial was the fourth of an impeached president. No president has ever been convicted.

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New details about Trump-McCarthy shouting match show Trump refused to call off the rioters

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Washington (CNN)In an expletive-laced phone call with House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy while the Capitol was under attack, then-President Donald Trump said the rioters cared more about the election results than McCarthy did.”Well, Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are,” Trump said, according to lawmakers who were briefed on the call afterward by McCarthy.McCarthy insisted that the rioters were Trump’s supporters and begged Trump to call them off.Trump’s comment set off what Republican lawmakers familiar with the call described as a shouting match between the two men. A furious McCarthy told the President the rioters were breaking into his office through the windows, and asked Trump, “Who the f–k do you think you are talking to?” according to a Republican lawmaker familiar with the call.

The newly revealed details of the call, described to CNN by multiple Republicans briefed on it, provide critical insight into the President’s state of mind as rioters were overrunning the Capitol. The existence of the call and some of its details have been previously reported and discussed publicly by McCarthy.The Republican members of Congress said the exchange showed Trump had no intention of calling off the rioters even as lawmakers were pleading with him to intervene. Several said it amounted to a dereliction of his presidential duty.

“He is not a blameless observer, he was rooting for them,” a Republican member of Congress said. “On January 13, Kevin McCarthy said on the floor of the House that the President bears responsibility and he does.”Speaking to the President from inside the besieged Capitol, McCarthy pressed Trump to call off his supporters and engaged in a heated disagreement about who comprised the crowd. Trump’s comment about the would-be insurrectionists caring more about the election results than McCarthy did was first mentioned by Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, a Republican from Washington state, in a town hall earlier this week, and was confirmed to CNN by Herrera Beutler and other Republicans briefed on the conversation.”You have to look at what he did during the insurrection to confirm where his mind was at,” Herrera Beutler, one of 10 House Republicans who voted last month to impeach Trump, told CNN. “That line right there demonstrates to me that either he didn’t care, which is impeachable, because you cannot allow an attack on your soil, or he wanted it to happen and was OK with it, which makes me so angry.””We should never stand for that, for any reason, under any party flag,” she added, voicing her extreme frustration: “I’m trying really hard not to say the F-word.””I think it speaks to the former President’s mindset,” said Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, an Ohio Republican who also voted to impeach Trump last month. “He was not sorry to see his unyieldingly loyal vice president or the Congress under attack by the mob he inspired. In fact, it seems he was happy about it or at the least enjoyed the scenes that were horrifying to most Americans across the country.”As senators prepare to determine Trump’s fate, multiple Republicans thought the details of the call were important to the proceedings because they believe it paints a damning portrait of Trump’s lack of action during the attack. At least one of the sources who spoke to CNN took detailed notes of McCarthy’s recounting of the call.Trump and McCarthy did not respond to requests for comment.It took Trump several hours after the attack began to eventually encourage his supporters to “go home in peace” — a tweet that came at the urging of his top aides.At Trump’s impeachment trial Friday, his lawyers argued that Trump did in fact try to calm the rioters with a series of tweets while the attack unfolded. But his lawyers cherry-picked his tweets, focusing on his request for supporters to “remain peaceful” without mentioning that he also attacked then-Vice President Mike Pence and waited hours to explicitly urge rioters to leave the Capitol.A source close to Pence said Trump’s legal team was not telling the truth when attorney Michael van der Veen said at the trial that “at no point” did the then-President know his vice president was in danger.Asked whether van der Veen was lying, the source said, “Yes.” Former Pence aides are still fuming over Trump’s actions on January 6, insisting he never checked on the vice president as Pence was being rushed from danger by his US Secret Service detail.It’s unclear to what extent these new details were known by the House Democratic impeachment managers or whether the team considered calling McCarthy as a witness. The managers have preserved the option to call witnesses in the ongoing impeachment trial, although that option remains unlikely as the trial winds down.The House Republican leader had been forthcoming with his conference about details of his conversations with Trump on and after January 6.Trump himself has not taken any responsibility in public.

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